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Size Chart

The biggest disadvantage that online stores have compared to physical ones is that your customers can’t try your products on. You might say you carry sizes 0-22, or that your glasses fit faces of all shapes, but your sizes and shapes may not always perfectly align to the ones your customers know.

In our post on handling product variations, we mentioned how a company selling t-shirts makes their fit and sizing information clear with a visual chart showing how each shirt size fits a model, plus the standard details on width, length, and so on:

TeePublic's sizing chart is a great example of how to go the extra mile for customers who might be unsure about sizing. (Click or tap to view at full size)
TeePublic‘s sizing chart is a great example of how to go the extra mile for customers who might be unsure about sizing.

Creating a page dedicated to making the sizing, fit, and specifications of your products is one of the best things a fashion store can do. This allows shoppers to set their expectations right away, know which size will fit them best, and order the product that’s right for them. It also reduces the possibility of returns, which is another bonus.

Xero Shoes has a highly detailed page specifically for customers who are buying their barefoot-style running sandals for the first time, detailing step-by-step how shoppers should measure their feet, print a template, and match themselves to the corresponding size on their store:

A detailed sizing chart for your new barefoot sandals, just what Xero Shoes shoppers need.
A detailed sizing chart for your new barefoot sandals, just what Xero Shoes shoppers need.

With a page like this one, potential customers will have a resource right at their fingertips to use if they have questions or concerns. No more sending you emails or calling you on the phone about sizing or fit — they’ll be able to get that information themselves, and feel confident about it as well.